Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report . Turnover in Trump's first year was more than triple that in former President Barack Obama's first year, and double the rate in President Ronald Reagan's White House. A full 34 percent of high-level White House aides either resigned, were fired or moved into different...

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Can Amazon Fit Into Atlanta's Corporate Culture?

Georgia leaders are pulling out all the stops in hopes Amazon will deliver its prime second headquarters to the Atlanta area.

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On this edition of Political Rewind, 6th District Congresswoman Karen Handel is tapped to help other GOP candidates for congress on how to run for office in the anti-Trump atmosphere, but the AJC’s Jim Galloway says Governor Nathan Deal may be the best model for Republicans on how to win. 

This week marks the 157th anniversary of Georgia’s decision to secede from the union. By 1861, eleven states had left the United States to form the Confederacy. The new nation lasted four years before its defeat in 1865. But the dream of secession is still very much alive. We talk about this with Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia. And Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University.

 

 

 

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The Breakroom gang joined host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included podcast host Kalena Boller, former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, Korea Daily reporter HB Cho, and Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown.

Christopher Bartelsk

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re discussing the life and music of jazz singer Billie Holiday with actress Terry Burrell, who’s now playing her on stage, and Emory musicologist Dwight Andrews.

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The weekend is almost here, and there's plenty to do in Savannah. Heather Henley of Do Savannah and Bill Dawers of hissing lawns have some suggestions.

Bill's picks:

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A Kentucky man who allegedly tackled his neighbor, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, in a dispute over their adjacent yards has been charged with assaulting a member of Congress resulting in personal injury, a felony under federal law.

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Indiana announced the charge brought against Bowling Green, Ky., resident Rene A. Boucher.

The 59-year old Boucher has agreed to plead guilty to the federal charge.

The Department of Justice intends to retry Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and Salomon Melgen, after a federal judge declared a mistrial in the bribery and fraud case.

The notice, filed Friday, was brief and requested a retrial "at the earliest possible date."

"The decision to retry this case was made based on the facts and the law, following a careful review," the department explained in a statement. "The conduct alleged in the indictment is serious and warrants retrial before a jury of citizens in the District of New Jersey."

In 1971, Winnette Willis was a 23-year-old single mom in Chicago when she became pregnant again. "I was terrified of having another child," she tells Radio Diaries.

Before the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade 45 years ago, abortion was illegal in most of the United States, including in Illinois.

Women like Willis who wanted to terminate their pregnancies had limited and often frightening options. She wasn't sure what to do. And then one day, while she was waiting on an L train platform, she saw a sign.

Almost a year after President Trump tried to bar travelers from some predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, the Supreme Court announced Friday that it will consider a legal challenge to the third version of that ban.

Facebook is rolling out a major change to its News Feed: pushing up news articles that come from "high quality" sources, and pushing down the others. The move signals that, in an effort to combat the problem of fake news, the social media giant is willing to play a kind of editorial role — making decisions based on substance, not just how viral a headline may be.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a post to his Facebook page:

The past few NFL seasons have been mired in controversy, from findings about concussions and brain damage to injustice protests and domestic violence.

Have you changed your viewing habits as a result? If you have, Weekend Edition wants to hear from you.

Whether you're watching more football now, or less, let us know below, and tell us why. Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's been quite a news week, even by recent standards.

The U.S. is potentially hours away from a partial government shutdown. The debate rages on over the president's reported comments about not wanting to accept immigrants from "s**thole countries." "Girtherism" has erupted over the president's latest height and weight measurements. Officials are scrambling to figure out how to avoid another false ballistic missile alarm, like the one residents of Hawaii suffered last weekend.

The Hotel California was, according to a case filed against it by legendary rock band The Eagles, living it up a little too much. The rock band sued the Mexico-based hotel, which shares a name with the band's iconic 1976 song, resulting in a settlement Thursday. The settlement's terms were not disclosed.

Jurors in eastern Canada on Friday found three men not guilty of criminal negligence following an oil train disaster that left 47 people dead. The accident in July 2013 involved a U.S.-owned train carrying North Dakota crude oil. In the aftermath, regulators in the U.S. and Canada adopted sweeping reforms to the way railroads haul and manage hazardous cargoes.

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